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  • Chance McNeely

Need a Change in Public Policy? Seek First to Understand.

Updated: Jul 8, 2020

A public policy exists for a reason. That is not to say the ends always justify the means. More often than not, laws provide direction to government agencies that then get into the weeds through regulations. If you need to change a law or regulation, know that research matters. Whether you are a business, government entity, or non-profit, your proposed changes need to be very well constructed and considerate of logistical and political realities. The policy in place is so for a reason and it will be necessary to develop a more compelling reason for change.


Far too frequently, governments and businesses pursue changes in public policy without seeking to fully understand the perspectives of other parties. When you craft a concept or develop language to change public policy, you should always seek to get it right. Note this is very different than simply seeking to be right. 


Good public policy does not pick a single winner or a single loser. On occasion, political dynamics will allow for monumental shifts in public policy. More often than not, efforts to make monumental shifts result in gridlock and unhappy campers. 


We've been regulators and also have represented various business interests: trust us when we say there is always a way to move the needle on an issue. We possess the unique ability to analyze an issue, understand each party's perspective, and navigate politics to get the policy approach right. If a public policy is not serving you well, let us help you get it right and get it done. 

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